Lifestyle

Study looks at impact of bhangra dancing on women's health

Researchers at SFU are studying the effect bhangra dancing and exercise have on the health of post-menopausal South Asian women. - SFU
Researchers at SFU are studying the effect bhangra dancing and exercise have on the health of post-menopausal South Asian women.
— image credit: SFU

Simon Fraser University researchers are studying the impact bhangra dancing and standard exercise programs have on the health of post-menopausal South Asian women.

To date, about 50 women have completed or are currently completing sessions and researchers are looking for more women to participate. The majority of participants are long-term, stay-home moms and housewives from Surrey.

SFU PhD candidate Iris Lesser says the South Asian Exercise Trial (SAET) is focusing on how exercise affects body fat and cardiovascular health. Women who have completed the program say it is also having mentally positive effects.

Lesser is hoping to draw another 15 female participants to join the last of three 12-week sessions, starting in mid-August and taking place at the North Surrey Recreation Centre, a partner on the SFU study. The women need to be inactive, without diabetes or heart disease, and with a waist size greater than 80 centimetres.

Fitness instructor Mandeep Patrola leads the women through 60-minute sessions three times a week.

“The women are providing key data for the SFU study, and learning that while exercise is important, it can also be fun,” she says. “I’m already seeing a difference in these women.”

The study is one of several underway by SFU’s Community Health Research Team (CoHeaRT). Researchers in health sciences, kinesiology and geography are studying population health and associated determinants of obesity, heart disease and other chronic diseases, while working to develop community-based solutions to improving disease management.

Lesser says low engagement in physical activity among South Asians has been shown to explain the more than 20 per cent of the excess heart disease deaths within the population.

Inner abdominal fat, which surrounds the abdominal organs, is associated with higher health risks and has been found to be a greater amount of total body fat in South Asians.

“Exercise can benefit the community and have great impact through improved health as well as increased social connectedness,” Lesser adds. “The South Asian community is growing and yet it is lacking the specialized cultural focus that would allow physical activity to become an integral part of one’s lifestyle.”

Study results from the SAET are expected by the year’s end. To participate in the final study session call Lesser at 778-782-7748 or email iris.lesser@sfu.ca.

 

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