Letters to the Editor

Compassion should extend to unborn babies

One sign of a humane society is how we react when introduced to something unexpected and unwanted.

The recent discovery in Surrey of a raccoon found stuck in a leg-hold trap and the subsequent public discussion shows us a number of things.

First of all, it is completely understandable that when one discovers an unexpected and unwanted critter under their deck or in their shed the initial reaction is to get rid of it – for it is unwanted. Secondly, the reaction by those who have compassion for animals gives us a clear example of how even though a certain species is not wanted, there are better ways to deal with the situation. The call for a ban on leg-hold traps is one example of providing more protection for raccoons.

Although difficult to confirm the numbers, there is another species in Canada that currently lacks protection under the law. The understandable reaction of some Canadians upon discovering an unexpected or unwanted child growing within is to get rid of it. While there are multiple ways to accomplish this, many are barbaric and fatal for the unwanted individual. As a society we must provide humane alternatives.

It is laudable to advocate for protection of animals. How much more then to advocate for something far more precious than an urban raccoon?

If we are truly a humane and compassionate society then it’s time for Canadians ask for lawful protection of unborn babies, even though they may come unexpectedly or are not wanted.

 

 

 

Mike Schouten

Surrey

 

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