Letters to the Editor

Energy creation doesn’t mean jobs

Young people should be very encouraged by the job creation and economic development news of the past several weeks.

Jobs are a huge topic for young people as they look to build careers, raise families and contribute to society.

However, there appears to be a discrepancy between the energy intensive economic development and job creation planned for B.C. and the “go slow” approach to energy development that seems to have taken hold in the corridors of the provincial government.

At present, B.C. only has enough generating capacity to meet existing electricity demand.

If B.C. doesn’t add a substantial amount of new generating capacity how will the increased electricity demand from new mines, LNG plants and other energy intensive industries be satisfied?

This seems to be a very fundamental question and one that needs to be addressed.

The vision to develop B.C. economically and create jobs is very encouraging.

But I really am left wondering where the energy to power this vision is going to come from if we don’t also take bold steps to develop new electricity generating capacity at the same time.

 

Mike Taylor

Port Moody

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