Letters to the Editor

Higher prices, less service from Canada Post

  - Canada Post
— image credit: Canada Post

Scrooge is alive under the name of Canada Post.

As aging Baby Boomers get on the pension dole, managers and executives are looking for ways to secure their pensions and benefits in the future. Crown corporations (such as BC Ferries, BC Hydro, Canada Post and others) are looking at their personal bottom lines.

These institutions are not concerned about people and the notion that government work is to serve the people.

They aim to secure their pensions by downsizing the current workforce and increasing the prices of their services.

These new measures taken by Canada Post are about ensuring they can pay for the benefits and pensions of the retiring Baby Boomer workforce.

Asking $1 per stamp (purchased on an individual basis) and a 35 per-cent increase in the cost of a book of stamps is surely nothing more than greed.

They say the Internet and online banking have caused their profits to diminish, but the truth is, Canada Post is run by fuddy-duddies that have failed to keep up with the current technology and the changing of times. They are not competitive in today’s world and have failed the public due to their lack of innovative thinking.

Perhaps an audit of Canada Post’s top executive pay is due and the running of the Crown corporation to see if the public dollar is really spent wisely.

The paying public needs to push back against government institutes that think they can repeatedly go back to the trough for more cash with less service.

Does the rest of Canada agree?

 

Sandra Steffan

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