Letters to the Editor

Are feds serious about environment?

In recent years, the federal government has given over $400 million of our tax dollars to rich oil, gas and pipeline companies to “go green,” even for capturing carbon pollution and burying it underground.

So why would Port Metro Vancouver, of whose board of directors, eight out of 11 are appointed by the federal government, be  even considering the request of Fraser Surrey Docks to install a transfer facility to ship up to eight million tonnes of U.S. thermal coal to China annually?

Are they oblivious to the horrendous smog which is enveloping many cities? Do they even care that for every tonne of coal burned, more than two tonnes of pollution is emitted into the atmosphere, much of it falling back onto our own country?

If the federal government is as serious about the environment as the above would indicate, why don’t they give Port Metro Vancouver some guidance and tell them to deny the request by Fraser Surrey Docks? Someone needs to wake up before it’s too late.

 

David Gibbs, Surrey

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